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Sagittarius A* or Sgr A*, as it’s more commonly  described, is a supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way.  It’s big and bad, containing about 4 million times the mass of our Sun.  It’s also given to odd behavior – scientists say they can identify  mysterious flares being emitted for a few hours each day.
After  years seeking an explanation, astronomers using new data from the  Chandra X-ray Observatory now think they have found the answer: Sgr A*  may simply be vaporizing and actually “devouring” asteroids which cross  its path. Think of it as a galactic burp.

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Sagittarius A* or Sgr A*, as it’s more commonly described, is a supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way. It’s big and bad, containing about 4 million times the mass of our Sun. It’s also given to odd behavior – scientists say they can identify mysterious flares being emitted for a few hours each day.

After years seeking an explanation, astronomers using new data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory now think they have found the answer: Sgr A* may simply be vaporizing and actually “devouring” asteroids which cross its path. Think of it as a galactic burp.

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